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Queer City: A CNN Experience

Queer City: A CNN Experience

An Official World Pride installation that provided viewers with a uniquely intimate look at the everyday people behind landmark moments in New York City’s queer history. This free multimedia museum experience went beyond conventional LGBTQIA+ timelines to reveal the personal stories and artifacts that made up a movement, decade by decade, from the 1940s through today in New York City.

#89 Worldstar

#89 Worldstar

Gimlet Media's Reply All: The unlikely rise of Lee O’Denat, the founder of Worldstar Hip Hop.

A Red Dot

A Red Dot

Radiotopia's 'Love + Radio:' Frank is an advocate for perhaps the most universally despised group in America: sex offenders. image by Moth Collective

Curious City Live

Curious City Live

WBEZ's Curious City presents three Chicago disaster stories as told at the Old Town School of Folk Music on March 30, 2016. Inspired by questions posed from Chicago-area residents, the tales range from the practically comical Loop flood of 1992, to a terrifying tornado that struck the region, to the city’s infamous Iroquois Theater fire.

Rajneeshpuram

Rajneeshpuram

Radiotopia's '99% Invisible:' This is a story about a spiritual city in rural Oregon. And it's got everything a good story should have: sex, drugs, enlightenment -- and state land use laws. photo courtesy of Yogi

Chicago’s Tornado-Proof Delusion

Chicago’s Tornado-Proof Delusion

WBEZ's 'Curious City:' Think tornadoes only cut through corn fields and small towns? Well, they can (and do) hit cities, too. Take it from survivors of a tornado that ripped through the suburbs and Chicago's South Side. photo courtesy of Oak Lawn Public Library

Ferry Tale

Ferry Tale

WBEZ's 'Curious City:' Lake Michigan was once a passenger steamer superhighway. Could a Chicago-to-Michigan route make a comeback? photo: The Lost Panoramas, published by CityFiles Press

Questioning Sex Offender Registries

Questioning Sex Offender Registries

NPR: Registered sex offenders say laws that make their identities public and restrict where they can live violate their civil rights. But victims' advocates argue the laws are necessary to keep families safe.

Recuse Yourself

Recuse Yourself

Life of the Law: When should a judge step aside? Most people can agree that when a judge’s family member appears in court, it’s the judge’s responsibility to bow out. Or, if a judge stands to profit directly from the outcome of the ruling — that’s pretty cut and dry, too. But what about this: can a judge remain impartial when a case concerns a person or group that contributed money, sometimes millions of dollars, to help that judge get elected? What then?

Inside Buckingham Fountain

Inside Buckingham Fountain

WBEZ's 'Curious City:' San Francisco has the Golden Gate Bridge. For New York City, it’s the Statue of Liberty. Chicago? It’s got Buckingham Fountain. This story is the lowdown on how the fountain shoots water so high, and why it was built to impress in the first place. photo courtesy of Alison Troldahl

Scents and Sensibility

Scents and Sensibility

NPR: Our sense of smell is a powerful trigger that captivates both scientists and a burgeoning subculture in Los Angeles… a community of people who collect fragrances like some people collect stamps. photo courtesy of Institute for Art and Olfaction

Fire Moves Fast

Fire Moves Fast

Atavist: Mary Henderson, June Parsons, and Forest Parsons recount memories of the fires that overtook their hometown over six decades ago. This piece is an excerpt from "15 Feet Below," a long-form multimedia documentary about the flooding of two towns in Northern Maine (see "New Media" page). photo courtesy of Dead River Area Historical Society,

A Couple Twice Born

A Couple Twice Born

NPR and PRX's 'State of the Re:Union:' When Dade Barlow decided to transition from living as a woman to a man, there were plenty of personal testimonials from transgender people on YouTube that Dade could watch. There were fewer videos for Dade’s wife, Tiffany, to give her a sense of the spouse’s journey. So: Dade and Tiffany decided to make their own YouTube channel, documenting their whole experience of Dade’s transition, from each of their perspectives. photo courtesy of Dade Barlow

How To Market To Millenials

How To Market To Millenials

NPR: For the last few months, NPR has been looking into millennials, as part of our series called New Boom. This group, some 80 million strong, spends over $1 trillion a year by some estimates. So, we wondered: How should brands and advertisers go about reaching millennials if they're so powerful, but also so different, than generations before them? photo courtesy of a participant

producing

#86 Man of the People

#86 Man of the People

Gimlet Media's Reply All: This week — a new technology falls into the wrong hands.

#78 Very Quickly to the Drill

#78 Very Quickly to the Drill

Alex and PJ chase down the strangest tips from our Weird Ads hotline, and at the bottom of the rabbit hole they find the Mother of All AdWords Scams.

#76 Lost in a cab

#76 Lost in a cab

Liz lost her camera in a cab, so she went to the New York City Taxi website to submit it to their lost and found database. At least, that's what she thought she did. Alex investigates and finds a big business behind the success of a suspicious little website.

Hoodies Up

Hoodies Up

ESPN's 30 for 30: Today, the story of a photograph taken in a hotel ballroom by the NBA’s Miami Heat. It’s a photo that can be seen as the opening bracket of a new era of athlete activism. But more than that, the behind the scenes story of how and why this photo came to exist tells us a lot about our current moment in history and what happens when celebrity, politics and sports come together in a single image.

The Dean Scream Revisited

The Dean Scream Revisited

538's Elections Podcast: A "Dean Scream" is shorthand for a campaign disaster. But did Howard Dean's 2004 shriek even happen the way it's remembered? And did the moment really doom his campaign?

The Dean Scream Revisited (Excerpt)

The Dean Scream Revisited (Excerpt)

On the Media: An excerpt from 538's Elections Podcast full documentary about Howard Dean's infamous scream.

Countering The 8-Hour Sleep Schedule

Countering The 8-Hour Sleep Schedule

NPR: Many assume that sleeping 8 or 9 consecutive hours at night is instinctual. But in a recent essay in Aeon, Karen Emslie says that this sleep schedule is in fact distinctly modern. photo: Sese kim, 2011

A Shadow Economy In An E-Graveyard

A Shadow Economy In An E-Graveyard

NPR: The average American produces an estimated 66 pounds of electronic waste every year. It's gotta go somewhere. Often, in violation of the law, that means a dump in the developing world — like the region of Agbogbloshie in the West African nation Ghana. photo: Yepoka Yeebo

Sounds of Space

Sounds of Space

NPR: NASA released a collection of sound effects from both this world and deep, intergalactic space into the Public Domain. They are now available for all of us to enjoy and perhaps use to make music. photo: NASA

A History Of Sexual Consent Policies

A History Of Sexual Consent Policies

NPR: California just became the first state to pass a law mandating that colleges require their students obtain affirmative, conscious and voluntary sexual consent. You might remember, 20 years ago, Antioch College became a national laughing stock for enacting a similar policy. photo: Wolfram Burner, 2013

What Does Its Banner Say About ISIS?

What Does Its Banner Say About ISIS?

NPR: The so-called Islamic State is known for its social media savvy, but they also use more traditional propaganda: a flag. Vexillologist Ted Kaye about its design and history. photo: Thierry Ehrmann, 2015

Patton Oswalt, 'Silver Screen Fiend'

Patton Oswalt, 'Silver Screen Fiend'

NPR: Before he made it big in Holloywood, actor, writer and comedian Patton Oswalt was a junkie — addicted to movies, as he explains in a new memoir, 'Silver Screen Fiend.'

'Bailando:' A Crossover Hit

'Bailando:' A Crossover Hit

NPR: How did Spanish singer Enrique Iglesias' "Bailando" become a crossover hit? photo: Andrea Balducci, 2009

A Poet Parses The Legacy Of War

A Poet Parses The Legacy Of War

NPR: In his memoir, My Life as a Foreign Country, the poet Brian Turner looks to prose, using fragmented, lyrical language to explore his inheritance of war and what it means to be a soldier today.

The Corporatization Of Terror

The Corporatization Of Terror

NPR: The Sunni extremist group that calls itself the Islamic State has captured huge parts of Iraq and Syria with sheer brutality. ISIS likes to present itself as a descendent of a seven century caliphate. But captured documents show that its business and management structure is modern and sophisticated, more like a multinational corporation than an ancient religious dynasty. photo: Thierry Ehrmann, 2014